Monday 5th September: 52 Pritchatts Road
14:00 Registration Lobby of 52 Pritchatts Road    
14:30 Session 1  Greek Commentaries
Chair: David Parker
Room: Lecture Theatre 1
Cyprian/Lactantius
Chair: Ben Haupt
Room: Seminar Room 15
Pseudo-Dionysius
Chair: Ann Conway-Jones
Room: Seminar Room 16
    Griffith, “It ought to say”: Metatextual observations in Greek patristic commentaries on Galatians Andrade Godoy, Orthodoxy, heresy and Episcopal authority in third-century Church: the debates between Saint Cyprian of Carthage, the laxist and the rigorist clergy  Vasilescu, “If you wish to contemplate God”: Pseudo-Dionysius on will and love 
    Panella, Is it as simple as just “copy-paste”? The case of the Pauline Catena Manuscripts Murphy, Cyprian, Parenthood, and the Hebrew Bible: Modelling Munificence and Martyrdom Wellington, The Language of Love: Pseudo-Dionysius' Detoxification of Eros in De Divinis Nominibus IV
    Stefaniw, Commentaries as Knowledge Production in the Tura Papyri Mackerras, Foolish Faith: Defending Christian Wisdom in Paul and Lactantius Muthreich, Different accounts of the Martyrdom of St. Paul and their significance of the “Epistola ad s. Timotheum de passione apostolorum Petri et Pauli” ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite
16:00 Tea
17:00 Session 2 Cappadocians (1)
Chair: Elena Vasilescu
Room: Lecture Theatre 1
Tertullian
Chair: Carl Johan Berglund
Room: Seminar Room 15
Later Latin
Chair: Tom Hunt
Room: Seminar Room 16
    Conway-Jones, T πάντων παραδοξότατον: The ‘place of God’ according to Gregory of Nyssa and Evagrius of Pontus Burke, “Render unto Caesar the things of Caesar and to God the things of God”: Contextualising Tertullian’s Reception and Interpretation of a Dominical Command  MacLachlan, Keep On Citing the Fathers: where do the texts of Galatians go after the early commentaries?
    G Thomas, Gregory Nazianzen: Interpreting the Human Eikon of God in Light of Pagan Eikones  Haupt, Tertullian the Code-Switcher? Cremin, Christ the physician, affliction and spiritual healing in Bede’s homilies for Lent and Holy Week.
18:00 Plenary 1 Young, Teasing out meaning: some techniques and procedures in early Christian exegesis.
Chair: David Cheetham
Room: Gisbert Kapp 203
19:15 Dinner for all registered participants hosted by the COMPAUL project. King Edward's School dining hall
 
Tuesday 6th September: The Nicolson Building
08:15 Morning Prayer, Keen Room, Nicolson Building
09:00 Session 3 Paul and the NT
Chair: Ben Haupt
Room: Nettlefold Room
Augustine (1)
Chair: Jenny Rallens
Room: Guest Room
Religion and Society
Chair: Luise Frenkel
Room: Keen Room
    Dormandy, "in every letter"? Some Proposed Patristic Evidence for the Authorship of Ephesians Stacey, Augustine on Faith and Evidence
    Petroelje, "The Epistle 'Which Stands in the Middle': Reading Ephesians with the Greek and Latin Fathers" Kurlavičiūtė, Augustine’s Conception of Signum: The Interplay Between Early Stoicism and Theology  Hunt, Civilisation and barbarism in Riegl, Marrou and Benjamin
    Pylvanainen, A Common Purpose for Paul and the Female Deacons? Koet, "Homines per homines discunt." No Divine Revelation without Human Learning: Augustine’s Prologue to De doctrina christiana  Huggins, Chrysostom and Chomsky: The Message of Social Justice and Economic Equality in the 21st Century
10:30 Coffee
11:00 Plenary 2 Strawbridge, Taking up Armour: The challenges of early Christian exegesis of Ephesians
Chair: Hugh Houghton
Room: Nettlefold Room
12:00 Session 4 Zellentin, Gentile Purity in Origen, the Clementine Homilies, and the Qur’an: Sectarian Observances or Mainstream Practices? Toca, The formation of the Isidorian letter-collection and its monastic contexts Lebechi, Orthodoxy vs Heterodoxy on the Meaning of Divine Sonship: A critical Reading of De Decretis Nicaenae Synodi 7.1 of Athanasius of Alexandria
12:30 Lunch
Activity 13:15 Visit to Cadbury Research Library manuscript dept. Booked participants only. Meet at reception desk Nicolson Building 13:30 Meet the publishers (Guest Room)
14:30 Session 5 Origen (1)
Chair: Ann Conway-Jones
Room: Nettlefold Room
Jerome
Chair: Edwina Murphy
Room: Guest Room
Pelagianism
Chair: Paul Parvis
Room: Keen Room
  Berglund, Origen’s vacillating stances towards Heracleon, his “Valentinian” predecessor in using Greek philology to interpret the Gospel of John Males, Jerome and the Problem of the Seventy Malavasi, Cyril of Alexandria and Augustine’s anti-Pelagian treatises: De Gestis Pelagii and/or De Natura et Gratia?
    Hall, Origen and astrology Rybka, Jerome’s and Ambrosiaster’s Interpretations of Jerusalem Council’s Prohibitions (Acts 15:20.29) Zilker, Exegesis and rhetorical strategies in Julian of Aeclanum’s Ad Florum
    Hermanin de Reichenfeld, ‘The Material of the Gifts from God’. Is the Spirit a Creature in Origen’s Commentary on the Gospel of John?  Esterson, A post-colonial reading of Jerome's 129th epistle to Dardanus: what is Jerome actually saying about Christian Holy and Promised Lands? James, Who was Arnobius the Younger?
15:45 Tea
16:15 Session 6 Greek Second Century
Chair: Rosalind MacLachlan
Room: Nettlefold Room
Augustine (2)
Chair: Susan Griffith
Room: Guest Room
Greek Spirituality and Theology
Chair: Dora Panella
Room: Keen Room
    Heath, Why Christians Prefer Beards:  Cultivation of Taste in Clement of Alexandria Paedagogos II-III  Rallens, Paul’s Smell in Augustine’s Psalms:  The Role of Noses, Scents, and Smelling in Augustinian Affections Boura, Cyril of Alexandria interprets the two Letters to Corinthians from the apostle Paul: the issues, the influences and the progress of theology
    Hartog, Clement of Alexandria’s Reception of Biblical 'Child' and ‘Fear’ Imagery in Cultural Context Hoff, Augustine on the Resurrection of the Flesh Artemi, The use of the Pauline literature in the dogmatic teaching of John Damascenes
    Hudson, Theophilus of Antioch and the earliest surviving Christian commentary Janby, The liberal arts in Augustine's mature works Niggemann, The Influence of the Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament in Symeon the New Theologian's Hymns
    Cerioni, “For now we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face” (1Cor 13:12). Pauline receptions in Origen’s Commentary on the Song of Songs Irizar, Semper profice: The evolving Augustinian imago Dei as a case study of the criteria used to evaluate (dis)continuity in Augustine's thought on gratia Lemeni, Becoming All Things to All People: Saint Paul and the Spiritual Fatherhood in the early Church
18:00 Finish
Participants to make own arrangements for evening meal
 
Wednesday 7th September: The Nicolson Building
08:15 Morning Prayer, Keen Room, Nicolson Building
09:00 Session 7 Greek Second Century and Ephrem
Chair: Ben Haupt
Room: Nettlefold Room
Latin Sectarianism
Chair: Hugh Houghton
Room: Guest Room
Medieval Approaches
Chair: Tom Hunt
Room: Keen Room
    Ip, Divine simplicity in Athenagoras’ Legatio pro Christianis Bruce, Appealing to Antichrist: a Critical Examination of Donatist Juridical Appeals Kunitz-Dick, Jerome’s Commentary on Haggai in the Early Middle Ages
    M Thomas, Paul in Justin Martyr’s Dialogue with Trypho and the ‘Pauline captivity’ narrative  Grabau, Johannine Citations in the 'Latin Chrysostom': Donatist Exegesis and Theology? Quero-Sánchez, Origen's and Meister Eckhart's Understanding of the Epistle to the Romans: A Comparative Analysis
    Tanase, “Within the Veil” (καταπέτασμα) – salvation as a garment. The Syrian (nuhrā qaddīša) reception of the Pauline spirituality of divine light (δόξα) P Parvis, Whistling in the Exegetical Dark: The Anonymous Commentary on Job and the Opus Imperfectum in Matthaeum Kreijkes, Chrysostom’s Exegesis of Galatians: a Dubious Translation Tool for John Calvin
10:30 Coffee
11:00 Plenary 3 Parker, Where Does Patristics Begin?
Chair: Christina Kreinecker
Room: Nettlefold Room
12:00 Session 8 Frenkel, Historiographic narratives on the authority of imperial writings in Christian polemics Smeets, Taming the Rhinoceros. Pauline Backing of Gregory’s Mission of Conversion Downer, Evidence for Sickness, Disability and Healing from the Egyptian Desert and Cities in Late Antiquity
12:30 Lunch
Activity 13:15 Visit to Cadbury Research Library manuscript dept. Booked participants only. Meet at reception desk Nicolson Building 13:15 Tour of Barber Institute collection. Booked participants only. Meet at reception desk Nicolson Building 13:30 Meet the publishers (Guest Room)
14:30 Session 9 Chrysostom
Chair: Susan Griffith
Room: Nettlefold Room
Latin Fourth Century
Chair: Sara Parvis
Room: Guest Room
Cappadocians (2)
Chair: Dora Panella
Room: Keen Room
    Pomeroy, Punctuating the Spirit: John Chrysostom and the ‘Absurd’ Reading of John 1.3-4 Vanspauwen, Christian Invectives Against Dualistic Manicheism: Evodius of Uzalis († c. 425-428) and his Treatise De Fide Contra Manichaeos Langworthy, The Spirit in Gregory Nazianzen's Portrayal of Paul
    Tallon, Chrysostom, preaching and jigsaws: did John Chrysostom preach on scripture in series? Gassman, Ambrosiaster and the Theorisation of ‘Paganism’ Cartwright, Vulnerable minds and vulnerable bodies as the secret of strength in Gregory of Nyssa 
    Bonfiglio, The Corpus Pseudo-Chrysostomicum: New Criteria? Houghton, An Introduction to the Exegesis of Fortunatianus of Aquileia Rozumna, The Concept of Zeal (Rom 12:11) in the Works of St Basil of Caesarea
15:45 Tea
16:15 Session 10 Origen (2)
Chair: Christina Kreinecker
Room: Nettlefold Room
Homoians
Chair: Rosalind MacLachlan
Room: Guest Room
Maximus the Confessor and Ephrem
Chair: Elena Vasilescu
Room: Keen Room
    Morlet, Paul as a key to interpreting Scripture according to Origen Wolfe, Gothic 'Homoianism'? Brown Dewhurst, An Ethics of Unity and Distinction: Love in Maximus' Cosmic and Ascetic Theology
    Mulder, Gospel differences and the authority of Scripture: A Critique of Francis B. Watson’s interpretation of Origen’s approach before and after Book 10 of his Commentary on John’s gospel S Parvis, The Macedonians, Meletius and the Myth of Homoian Ecclesiastical Supremacy 360-378 Portaru, The Mind-Body Problem in Late Antiquity: Nemesius and Maximus Confessor
17:05 Conclusion Concluding plenary session
Chair: Hugh Houghton
Room: Nettlefold Room
17:30 Finish
Participants to make own arrangements for evening meal


Organised lunch time activities

Meet the publishers

During these sessions, representatives from publishing houses will be available for a panel discussion on getting your work into print. The conversation will be aimed primarily at postgrads and early career researchers. Topics might include: What publishers are looking for; the challenges and opportunities of open access; what to do with your thesis. Do email birmingham.patristics@gmail.com with any topics you would like to see discussed. Places will be limited in the rooms available: please attend only one of these sessions so we can accommodate as many people as possible.

Cadbury Research Library tour

The Cadbury Research Library holds approximately 200,000 pre-1850 books and some 4 million manuscripts, including the uniquely rich Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern Manuscripts. This ‘behind the scenes’ tour will include the archive strong room and the conservation studio. It will end with a small display of items chosen especially for us. Each visit is limited to a maximum of 14 people.

Barber Institute Collections

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts was founded in 1932 by the eponymous Lady Barber to promote the study of art and music at the University of Birmingham. It has one of Europe's finest small art collections and a splendid concert hall housed in an elegant Art Deco building. The art collection presents a conspectus of European art history from medieval to modern periods through a choice selection of work by key artists including Botticelli, Bellini, Veronese, Rubens, Van Dyck, Poussin, Claude, Gainsborough, Turner, Ingres, Manet, Monet, Degas, Van Gogh, Gauguin and Magritte, plus some covetable art objects, statues and pieces of furniture. This half-hour gallery tour will feature highlights of the art collection and the building itself.

Other options

All delegates will be able to visit the University of Birmingham Botanic and Winterbourne House Museum free of charge during the conference (and they are both just next door to the venue)

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is also free to enter so you be able to enter to see the collections even if you are not on one of the organised tours.

Participants interested in staying an extra day to explore the attractions of Birmingham, such as its museums and art galleries (including the University's own Barber Institute), the Cadbury World factory tour, the Town Hall and Symphony Hall or the canal network, may also book accommodation on Wednesday night.